Climb to the Top of the Bunker Hill Monument

The first major battle of the American Revolution, the Battle of Bunker Hill in June of 1775, pitted the colonial army against the powerful British. The Bunker Hill Monument now stands as a testimonial to the determination of those colonial fighters. This obliesk monument has been open to the public since 1842.

Those who visit the Bunker Hill Monument stand amazed at the base of the 221 foot structure. The monument has no elevators, so visitors wishing to take in the incredible views at the pinnacle must likewise show determination. The [...]

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One Hundred Years of Baseball History in Fenway Park

Fenway Park is an icon of Boston and one of the most famous venues in professional baseball. First opened in April, 1912, the park was built by John I. Tailor, then-owner of the Red Sox. Named after its neighborhood, Fenway Park cost 650,000 to build and could seat 35,000 spectators.

The first pro game there saw the New York Highlanders, later the Yankees, battle the Boston Red Sox. The home team was victorious, and 27,000 fans cheered them on.

Purchased by Thomas Yawkey in 1933, the park was largely destroyed by a fire the following year. In April, the [...]

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Relive the Battle of Bunker Hill on Breed’s Hill

News of the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord in 1775 motivated Connecticut militiamen to travel to Boston, Massachusetts. Increasing American troops surrounding Boston prevented General Thomas Gage and his British troops from leaving the city.

Around 1,500 American troops of the Massachusetts regiments and General Putnam’s Connecticut regiment occupied Breed’s Hill and Bunker Hill on the Charlestown peninsula. When the Americans received word that the British army was making plans to leave Boston, the order was given to [...]

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The Two Sides of the Boston Massacre

I was watching a special on the History channel the other day about the Boston Massacre. Right after a commercial for home security Brooklyn, the special came back on and actually began addressing the British side of the event. We all know about the Boston Massacre but few of us realize that there are, in fact, two different sides to that story. The one many of us in the States have come to know is that on a cold winter day, a group of colonials struck out against a British patrol and were met with gunfire which erupted into a massacre.

Tensions between the colonials and Britain were already at their highest but the accounts tend to blur when it comes to what started it. Some people say that the British patrol antagonized the colonials long before it even started but some people say that the instigation was much more than just some harmless snowballs. Some accounts claim that actual rocks were thrown and the British patrol was literally being stoned to death by colonials. While we may never know how it truly started or who was more at fault, violence was met with violence and all we really have to show for it are some murdered ancestors and unspoken animosity that has never really gone away.

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Two If By Sea, the Old North Church

Yes, THAT North Church. The same one made famous by the poem, “Paul Revere’s Ride” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The one that inspired the famous line, “One if by land and two if by sea…” When you visit Boston is the Old North Church is definitely a “must-see”. Don’t pass up the chance to stand in the streets of Boston, just like Paul Revere once did. Gaze anxiously up at the tower of the Old North Church, imagining [...]

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Sixty Three Miles. Ride With Paul Revere

One if by land and two if by sea was the lantern signal that came on April 18, 1775 and began the 63 mile midnight ride for which Paul Revere is famous. First by rowboat across the Charles River from North Boston to Charlestown, then horseback to Concord he warned all patriots with the call “The Regulars are coming” (not “The British are coming”). This route encompasses the present day towns of Somerville, Medford and Arlington. Parts of the route offer annual reenactments of the ride.Want more? Click here.
Historical sites associated with [...]

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Freedom Trail, 2.5 Mile Walk Through History

Before you can appreciate the present, you must understand the past. So while you’re in Boston, Massachusetts, why don’t you walk the Freedom Trail and take a 2.5 mile tour through United States history?

Seventeen important, historic landmarks pepper the trail. From the Massachusetts State House to the Old South Meeting House, where the Boston Tea Party was planned, you can practically see the creation of the United States through the eyes of the founding fathers.Confused? Here ‘s a little help . Walking [...]

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Old Ironsides, Two Centuries in the Life of a Warship

You have probably heard of “Old Ironsides,” the “unsinkable” warship first launched in 1797. She was one of six warships authorized for construction or purchase by the Naval Act of 1794. Officially named the USS Constitution by George Washington, this amazing ship came to fame during the War of 1812, when British cannonballs kept bouncing off its sturdy wooden sides as if the ship was made of iron. During that war, it defeated five British warships and captured numerous merchant ships. In its long history, it has never been defeated in battle.

In the 1840′s, the Constitution circled the globe. [...]

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